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Wisdoms of Pearl: Tweens + Instagram = тωєєиѕтαgяαм !!!

http://wisdomsofpearl.tumblr.com/post/44064921127/tweens-instagram-g

wisdomsofpearl:

Post fast, delete fast. It is important to purge your photos once you’ve reached 40 (or was it 100? I’ll have to inquire within). This is the point at which Instagram takes ownership of your photos, so you will want to stay below that number. This is serious shit!

Need help with a tricky word game. Take a screenshot. Post it to instagram. Maybe consider @ing your friend who is gr8 with werds and write “help!”. A couple of minutes later you will get your answer. Delete photo from instagram. Continue game.

The practice of inventing entirely new layers and uses for apps and services that have no such structure is fascinating to me.

via Jenna Wortham

Actually, I think it’s pretty spot on.

Our relationship with free services

All of these free services—Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, even Tumblr (see section 6)—contain some language in their terms of service that goes a little somethin’ like this:


  Instagram does not claim ownership of any Content that you post on or through the Service. Instead, you hereby grant to Instagram a non-exclusive, fully paid and royalty-free, transferable, sub-licensable, worldwide license to use the Content that you post on or through the Service, except that you can control who can view certain of your Content and activities on the Service as described in the Service’s Privacy Policy, available here: http://instagram.com/legal/privacy/.
  Some or all of the Service may be supported by advertising revenue. To help us deliver interesting paid or sponsored content or promotions, you agree that a business or other entity may pay us to display your username, likeness, photos (along with any associated metadata), and/or actions you take, in connection with paid or sponsored content or promotions, without any compensation to you. If you are under the age of eighteen (18), or under any other applicable age of majority, you represent that at least one of your parents or legal guardians has also agreed to this provision (and the use of your name, likeness, username, and/or photos (along with any associated metadata)) on your behalf.
  

All those words boil down to this: yes, you own the copyright to original work you create, but publicly sharing any of it through [insert your free service of choice] means that you have granted said service an incredibly powerful and broad license to do with that work as it pleases, and it may very well not bother with tossing a dime your way.

They could use your photo on the landing page to attract new users to sign up for the service. They can sell your “anonymous” personal info to advertisers. Facebook can show your face as a recommendation next to an ad for a TV show page or product you liked. They could use a whole bunch of your photos in a pitch to businesses to sign up for premium services—you won’t get a dime, and they don’t need to ask permission because you already gave it to them in the terms of service you didn’t read when signing up.

To be crystal clear: I didn’t make that snarky statement to argue for condemning this type of business model, because that’s an entirely separate conversation. There are good arguments and reasons for and against building a business or service by giving some or even all features away for free. Maybe Facebook couldn’t have scored a billion users without giving everything away for free all this time. Then again, Facebook has recently started charging for things like promoted posts and gifts, of which both I am a fan. I’m also a huge fan of the stuff Tumblr charges for, like promoting posts (which it did before Facebook) and premium themes, which are head and shoulders above any other premium themes for other platforms in terms of quality and support, including WordPress. But I digress.

My real gripe is that, time and again, we’ve seen “Everything’s Free!” businesses make decisions like this, and every time, users and the press get all rabble rabble rabble as if it’s a surprise anymore. Sure, companies that offer paid products can make some wacky or just plain bad decisions. But I think you’ll be hard pressed to find, say, a company that sells $30 Mac apps or even $2 iPhone apps suddenly decide to start selling all your personal information to advertisers or use your likeness or content to sell products without paying you a dime.

If we’re going to use free services, we have to realize that nearly all bets are off.

Actually, I think it’s pretty spot on.

Our relationship with free services

All of these free services—Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, even Tumblr (see section 6)—contain some language in their terms of service that goes a little somethin’ like this:

  1. Instagram does not claim ownership of any Content that you post on or through the Service. Instead, you hereby grant to Instagram a non-exclusive, fully paid and royalty-free, transferable, sub-licensable, worldwide license to use the Content that you post on or through the Service, except that you can control who can view certain of your Content and activities on the Service as described in the Service’s Privacy Policy, available here: http://instagram.com/legal/privacy/.

  2. Some or all of the Service may be supported by advertising revenue. To help us deliver interesting paid or sponsored content or promotions, you agree that a business or other entity may pay us to display your username, likeness, photos (along with any associated metadata), and/or actions you take, in connection with paid or sponsored content or promotions, without any compensation to you. If you are under the age of eighteen (18), or under any other applicable age of majority, you represent that at least one of your parents or legal guardians has also agreed to this provision (and the use of your name, likeness, username, and/or photos (along with any associated metadata)) on your behalf.

All those words boil down to this: yes, you own the copyright to original work you create, but publicly sharing any of it through [insert your free service of choice] means that you have granted said service an incredibly powerful and broad license to do with that work as it pleases, and it may very well not bother with tossing a dime your way.

They could use your photo on the landing page to attract new users to sign up for the service. They can sell your “anonymous” personal info to advertisers. Facebook can show your face as a recommendation next to an ad for a TV show page or product you liked. They could use a whole bunch of your photos in a pitch to businesses to sign up for premium services—you won’t get a dime, and they don’t need to ask permission because you already gave it to them in the terms of service you didn’t read when signing up.

To be crystal clear: I didn’t make that snarky statement to argue for condemning this type of business model, because that’s an entirely separate conversation. There are good arguments and reasons for and against building a business or service by giving some or even all features away for free. Maybe Facebook couldn’t have scored a billion users without giving everything away for free all this time. Then again, Facebook has recently started charging for things like promoted posts and gifts, of which both I am a fan. I’m also a huge fan of the stuff Tumblr charges for, like promoting posts (which it did before Facebook) and premium themes, which are head and shoulders above any other premium themes for other platforms in terms of quality and support, including WordPress. But I digress.

My real gripe is that, time and again, we’ve seen “Everything’s Free!” businesses make decisions like this, and every time, users and the press get all rabble rabble rabble as if it’s a surprise anymore. Sure, companies that offer paid products can make some wacky or just plain bad decisions. But I think you’ll be hard pressed to find, say, a company that sells $30 Mac apps or even $2 iPhone apps suddenly decide to start selling all your personal information to advertisers or use your likeness or content to sell products without paying you a dime.

If we’re going to use free services, we have to realize that nearly all bets are off.

BREAKING: Great service you've been using free for years but can't be bothered to pay for must now make money by any means necessary, including changing its terms of service, signing away your increasingly delusional concept of "privacy," and licensing your content for any and all purposes or revenue which you won't see a penny for because those are the terms you agreed to but didn't read in the first place.

http://www.theverge.com/2012/12/17/3775992/instagram-privacy-policy-facebook-data-sharing