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No, Nate, brogrammers may not be macho, but that’s not all there is to it — Technology and Society — Medium

https://medium.com/technology-and-society/2f1fe84c5c9b

In the context of Nate Silver’s response to criticism that he’s hired a mostly white male staff for the FiveThirtyEight relaunch, Zeynep Tufekci uses French social theory and Dr. Seuss to explain why many culture groups, especially white-male-dominated tech, have an exclusionary blind spot.

About creepy guys

http://realsocialskills.tumblr.com/post/77287409108/about-creepy-guys

realsocialskills:

A lot of men (and probably other genders, but mostly men) like to creepily hit on people (usually women) in contexts in which it’s not ok to hit on people. (Eg: on the subway).

Girls start experiencing this before they’re considered old enough for sex ed.

Creepy men regularly do this in a way that’s slightly deniable.

Like sitting way too close. Or asking an almost innocuous thing. And it feels really horrible to be on the receiving end, but it can be hard to put your finger on why. And if you object, the man who started it will try as hard as he can to say you’re being unreasonable. Often, bystanders or people you tell afterwards will empathically agree and tell you he was just being friendly and that didn’t have to be rude.

This is not your fault.

At present, the harshest penalty available here at Boise State is expulsion, used only for the most heinous crimes, like cheating on Scantron exams. But now that lethal force is an option, I need to know which infractions may be treated as de facto capital crimes.

I assume that if a student shoots first, I am allowed to empty my clip; but given the velocity of firearms, and my aging reflexes, I’d like to be proactive. For example, if I am working out a long equation on the board and several students try to correct me using their laser sights, am I allowed to fire a warning shot?

When May I Shoot a Student? - NYTimes.com

This country is going fucking insane while the NRA and gun makers laugh all the way to the bank.

Jonathan Ferrell ran towards police seeking help after a car accident and was given a hail of bullets for his troubles. Renisha McBride went in search of a Good Samaritan after her accident and a shotgun blast answered her knock. Teenager Trayvon Martin walked home with candy and tea and was greeted by the nervous trigger finger wrapped in an adult’s gun. Jordan Davis sat in a car outside a convenience store listening to music and a man who objected to the volume cut his life short with the boom of a firearm. The principal crime all of them committed, like countless others over the centuries, was being black and not sufficiently prostrating themselves to ensure the comfort of others.

[Black History Month isn’t making life better for black Americans](http://www.theatlantic.com/national/archive/2014/02/black-history-month-isnt-making-life-better-for-black-americans/283767/)