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It’s quite the productive day for iPad and iPhone apps.

The best Mac and iPhone calendar app—Fantastical—has come to iPad. It has a lot of great tricks that set it apart from other calendar apps, like natural language support so you can type “biking with Jessi for two hours tom 12:30” to create an even for tomorrow. It also can show your Reminders alongside all your events, which is surprisingly useful.

Plus, the text snippet tool I can’t work without anymore, TextExpander, got a huge iOS 7 update and plenty of new features, including gestures to quickly copy and preview snippets and keyboard shortcuts. The list of apps that support it has also grown quite a bit, too.

It’s quite the productive day for iPad and iPhone apps.

The best Mac and iPhone calendar app—Fantastical—has come to iPad. It has a lot of great tricks that set it apart from other calendar apps, like natural language support so you can type “biking with Jessi for two hours tom 12:30” to create an even for tomorrow. It also can show your Reminders alongside all your events, which is surprisingly useful.

Plus, the text snippet tool I can’t work without anymore, TextExpander, got a huge iOS 7 update and plenty of new features, including gestures to quickly copy and preview snippets and keyboard shortcuts. The list of apps that support it has also grown quite a bit, too.

In other words, while the tides of attention-based, multi-million-dollar startups churn red with the blood of all the contenders, I think there’s a vast blue ocean waiting for independent developers to make prosumer and pro software. I look at an app like Editorial by Ole Zorn and think, “My god, that’s where the rest of us should be going.”

Jared Sinclair: The Indie Ocean

He’s right. Replacing your old ‘n busted Mac or PC with an iPad is more viable than ever, and more apps than ever are staring to mature. The “make it free” VCs aren’t after making viable products for the long haul, they’re just whipping out new shiny and rolling the mindshare dice to get bought out, drop the product and all its users, and move on to the next big win.

Lots of Mac developers jumped on iOS because they saw what was coming (after all, they are Apple customers) and brought over Mac-caliber apps. Maybe they were just a little ahead of their time. Maybe now, these kinds of apps will be right on time.