Instagram

Liked Posts

Showing 20 posts tagged xl

Nice eight-minute promo from Nokia about designing the Lumia 800, the “first true Windows Phone 7 phone,” according to CEO and former Microsoft executive Stephen Elop.

Yes, it’s the same kind of polished marketing fluff that Apple and a few other companies produce, but that’s the point. It’s polished, and they talk as passionately as engineers, executives, designers, and other nervous non-actors can about loving their work.

I’m genuinely interested in Windows Phone 7. Besides the horrible name, I think Microsoft is doing great work with it, and I’m trying to get a review unit so I can give the OS a real test on decent hardware and write about it.

via GigaOM

My iPhone and iPad trophy collection–it is growing.

On the left we have my favorite phone design of all time–the original iPhone–and on the right is my second favorite phone design–the iPhone 4. Then there is the other phone design in the middle.

Soon, my wife’s original iPad will take its rightful place, right next to Kermit. Probably after the iPad 3.

Thanks to vafarmboy for the original iPhone hookup.

My iPhone and iPad trophy collection–it is growing.

On the left we have my favorite phone design of all time–the original iPhone–and on the right is my second favorite phone design–the iPhone 4. Then there is the other phone design in the middle.

Soon, my wife’s original iPad will take its rightful place, right next to Kermit. Probably after the iPad 3.

Thanks to vafarmboy for the original iPhone hookup.

Raven for Mac looks like a fresh new site-specific browser that might finally give Todd Ditchendorf’s Fluid some real competition. Its sidebar takes a Twitter/Tweetie approach, and each site Raven supports gets custom subsections for key features. For example: Facebook’s subsections are News Feed, Messages, Friends, and Events. Raven’s Web App Shop—yes, there’s a built-in store for finding new web apps—already has a healthy catalog, including Google+, Meetup, CNN, Hacker News, Instapaper, Hulu, Dropbox, Vimeo, and more.

One downside to Raven’s approach, at least so far, seems to be that you can’t get the same kind of sidebar integration for apps that Raven does not explicitly support. You can browse to, say, Highrise and add it to Raven’s Favorites list, but it won’t get a pretty sidebar icon and custom subsections until the Raven team specifically adds support for it.

Still, this looks like a great approach to giving web apps a bit more prominence on your desktop. Well done, Raven.

via Jamie Phelps

Raven for Mac looks like a fresh new site-specific browser that might finally give Todd Ditchendorf’s Fluid some real competition. Its sidebar takes a Twitter/Tweetie approach, and each site Raven supports gets custom subsections for key features. For example: Facebook’s subsections are News Feed, Messages, Friends, and Events. Raven’s Web App Shop—yes, there’s a built-in store for finding new web apps—already has a healthy catalog, including Google+, Meetup, CNN, Hacker News, Instapaper, Hulu, Dropbox, Vimeo, and more.

One downside to Raven’s approach, at least so far, seems to be that you can’t get the same kind of sidebar integration for apps that Raven does not explicitly support. You can browse to, say, Highrise and add it to Raven’s Favorites list, but it won’t get a pretty sidebar icon and custom subsections until the Raven team specifically adds support for it.

Still, this looks like a great approach to giving web apps a bit more prominence on your desktop. Well done, Raven.

via Jamie Phelps